The Flash Review: Barry Finally Figures Out the Identity of His Tormenter

The Flash, Season 3, Episode 20, “I Know Who You Are”

After nearly full season of dead ends, false starts and general foul humor, The Flash finally got its act together and produced an entertaining hour that didn’t involve music, dancing or cast members from other CW shows.

This probably won’t go down as an all-time classic episode of the series, but given what viewers of the show have been fed this season, even these few scraps felt like a feast.

Despite being so late in the game, the series introduces Tracy Brand, who in four years will turn the scientific world on its ear with her discoveries; unfortunately in the present, she’s just a grad student who everyone thinks is a crackpot and is getting chased by Killer Frost.

Barry and the gang spend most of the episode trying to protect Tracy, who is a likable goof of a character that fulfills the redhead in residence at STAR Labs quota, now that Caitlin has gone rogue (and platinum blonde). What’s most important here is that Tracy is a catalyst for action, interaction and a chain reaction of interesting events.

Primarily it allows HR freedom to flirt with her incessantly, and bring in coffee. Tom Cavanaugh and Anne Dudek have an easy chemistry, and HR seems to calm and bring out the genius in Tracy — who, when not dodging flying ice daggers, comes up with the rudimentary plans for the Speed Force prison, based on some fake science about static electricity.

The chase also pits Team Flash against Killer Frost and produces some good moments for Julian and Cisco, who is afraid he might accidentally kill Caitlin if he loses control of his vibe powers. There was a also a nice chase through the streets of Central City, involving riding an ice luge.

Joe has his own spotlight story (sorry Wally and Iris but you are on the bench this week) when he’s mildly freaked out as Cecile accidentally drops the “L” word after a workout. Joe spends the episode trying to figure out if he’s ready to make that step, which would require him to come clean about everything, including his metahuman sons. Just when he decides to break things off, Killer Frost shows up to take Cecile hostage, and set up a time to exchange Tracy for Cecile.

The big battle at the end doesn’t finish cleanly, but the characters actually did stuff to move forward. Cisco, with help of a pep talk from Julian, is able to stop Killer Frost long enough to save both Cecile and Tracy, and get a blood sample that Julian can use to find a cure.

In the aftermath, Joe professes his love to Cecile ,and immediately runs home to tell his family about it. During the conversation, Barry puts together phrases and actions Savitar has made during the season, and comes with a startling conclusion – Savitar is a future version of himself.

That suspicion is confirmed at the end when Savitar steps out of his armor to reveal himself to be a physically and emotionally scarred version of Barry, who stays ahead of his present day self, because he’s already lived it.

The big reveal feels like a one-ton narrative burden has been lifted off the show. Team Flash now knows what it is up against, and can plan accordingly to avoid Iris’ date with the Grim Reaper. This show that has been running in circles for much of the back half of the season can finally move forward. It’s about time.

Craig Wack

Craig Wack

For a weekly discussion of comic book TV shows please join Craig Wack and Tatiana Torres for the Agents of GEEK podcast updated every Friday and now on iTunes

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  • the thing that just irks me is that it was so predictiable to be future barry. but i will say gustin looks like he is having fun being evil and crazy so there is that. Also yes the city wide battle was fun, it’s been a while since this show had actual superhero fun good times

  • Mote

    I know the show will spend the rest of the season answering this question, but why is Barry mad at himself? And with the super slow reveal, I am not sure that I even care.