God Loves His Children: Humans‘ Second Season Explores Awakening Androids Free in the World

humanssynths

Compared to Westworld, in AMC’s HUM∀NS, you’ll find it quite a bit easier to discern the Hosts Synths; the actors impart more robotic movement to their characters, and many of the androids have eerie eyes. The series’ themes are just as disturbing, and with Westworld‘s second season a distant (2018) dream, we fanatics will need another futuristic science fiction obsession.

If you’ve not already caught Season 1 (you call yourself a bot fan?), for shame! Starring William Hurt, Gemma Chan, Utopia‘s Neil Maskell, Emily Berrington, Ruth Bradley, Katherine Parkinson, Tom Goodman-Hill and Colin Morgan, the British-American collaboration (based on an award-winning Swedish series) takes place in a future where androids in the home are becoming commonplace, if not fully accepted or trusted by the average family member. Of course there are compelling explorations of how the Synths are used and treated, with secret goings-on between certain “masters” and their servile “employees” and as you’d expect, somewhere, something’s gone wonky with some of the Synths’ programming. Hurt’s Dr.George Millican is a frail genius whose specialty was AI research. He’s not nearly as nefarious as Anthony Hopkins’ Robert Ford, but just as irresistible a character to observe.

Season 2 features the excellent addition of Carrie-Anne Moss as AI researcher, Dr. Athena Morrow, brought in to deal with the consciousness problem, and Marshall Allman (True Blood, Prison Break) as Milo Khoury, head of the AI research corporation, Qualia. Here’s a first look at what’s coming our way.

 

Written by Sam Vincent and Jonathan Brackley, HUM∀NS returns to AMC in February 2017.

Cindy Davis

Cindy Davis

Editor-in-Chief. Former Senior News Editor at Pajiba.com and published at BUST.

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  • BiblioGlow

    Yay! I loved the first season. The characters are so interesting, and I like that they set up a parallel present instead of traveling into the future. You don’t see that in much sci fi. I do think the central conceit is sort of dumb – of course humans don’t treat you like humans, they think you’re normal walking-toaster robots, stop whining all the GD time, Niska – but the stories they use it to tell are interesting.

  • THEasscrackbandit

    D.A.M. is a QUEEN!!